Tactical Tip Of The Week

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Positioning of our equipment is a critical element in our overall ability to deploy our equipment during a confrontation. Where we position our handgun, secondary handgun, spare magazines, knife, flashlight and any other tool that you deem appropriate for your defense will determine how fast you can respond to a threat. Take the time to “test the system” by putting yourself in various positions upright, seated and on the ground and determine how assessable and rapidly you can deploy each piece of equipment you are carrying. Don’t hesitate to make any adjustments needed to ensure your system of positioning your equipment works for you.

 A safety tip from Lou Chiodo

 

 

Tactical Tip Of The Week

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We live in an era that has brought us so many technological innovations in the gear and equipment that we use. New handguns, long-guns and shotguns have been developed to give us the maximum performance possible from each system. This can give us a tremendous advantage in many scenarios. But no matter how advanced the firearm is, it can’t do anything without a properly trained, dedicated and determined fighter operating it. WE are the weapon system and the gear and equipment allows us to complete our mission effectively. Our primary focus needs to be on developing our maximum ability to utilize our gear and equipment. We must hone the tactics we use to bring them to bear on those that intend to harm us, our families or those we may be sworn to protect.

A safety tip from Lou Chiodo

 

Tactical Tip Of The Week

 

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Mental and physical conditioning is a critical element of personal protection. Seek knowledge about mental preparation for combat – knowledge is power. Many outstanding resources are available. Pay attention to your physical condition. Even though you are armed with a firearm, you may have to engage in a physical confrontation in conjunction with using your firearm to defend yourself. Consider your body as a part of your “weapon system” and your mind as the greatest weapon you possess.

 A safety tip from Lou Chiodo

Tactical Tip Of The Week

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Hi everyone, in this weeks “Tactical Tip” I have included an exert from course material I use when I present force-on-force training using airsoft technology. Force-on-force training is an essential part of someone’s training and development. It is where we learn how to apply what we have learned in our range training in a real time environment under conditions that can more adequately represent real world conditions.

FORCE-ON-FORCE TRAINING CONCEPTS

INTRODUCTION

 “Training conducted on the range helps the participant to learn the life-saving methodologies essential for dominating the tactical scenarios that he/she may confront in a real world encounter. The range is where the participant can develop the psychomotor skills required to hit the threat with combat accuracy. The range, however, is only one element of training. It is necessary to take the psychomotor skills developed in range training and integrate those skills in an environment that simulates conditions found in the combat environment.   It must be understood that it is very difficult to fully simulate combat in a training environment. The element that will always be missing in a training environment is that the participant is not in fear for his/her life. This means that there will be some differences in the physical and psychological impact on the participant depending on how he/she views the training environment.

 Our objective in this segment of training is to create a training environment that will allow for a realistic application of the methodologies that have been presented on the range against a “human target” (role player). The participant can use the skills developed on the range in a manner that will be consistent with the way he/she will use their weapon in a combat shooting. This training evolution creates an environment of increasing intensity. By operating in an environment of increasing   intensity, the participant will become accustomed to using his/her weapon in a manner consistent with the way the weapon will be used in a real word encounter”.

 A safety tip from Lou Chiodo